The Battle of Yaldabaoth – Album Review

Hang on for a minute...we're trying to find some more stories you might like.


Email This Story






Infant Annihilator released their brand new album, The Battle of Yaldabaoth, on September 11th, 2019, which is the drummer’s birthday.

The Battle of Yaldabaoth is what you’d expect from an IA album; fast, slow, heavy, chaotic, and disgusting in every good way possible. This album is meant to replicate a battle of false gods, the definition of Yaldabaoth is “The name of the Demiurge or ‘False God’.” It’s in no way about actual religion, for it is just fiction. However, this album definitely gives you the feeling like you’re in the middle of the battlefield. In the song, “Thy Kingdom Sitteth Lonely Beneath Thy Hollowed Heavens,” there is a sample of what seems to be a drill sergeant talking through a loudspeaker just driving the battle feeling to this album more. In the song “Plaugebearer,” it starts off with a catchy guitar riff along with their vocalist Dickie Allen, doing his “witch” high screams, which you can only imagine, sounds like a witch.

After that, it hits you with that same riff again, only louder and heavier. This one is definitely more of a slow and slam song, having 3 heavy-hitting breakdowns in under 5 minutes. The title track, simply called “The Battle of Yaldabaoth,” begins with chaos and ends, well differently. After the chaos in the beginning, it builds up slowly, with vocalist Alex Teyen from “Oceans Ate Alaska” making a guest spot in the song. After his part, it then goes straight into a breakdown which I can only describe as a cold chainsaw being pulled slowly over and over again. This song would really be fitting for a Texas Chainsaw Massacre movie. Right smack in the middle of the song, there’s a slow, yet eerie guitar solo. It’s very melodic and mostly on its own. The drums don’t really interfere more than give emphasis.

It ends with Alex Teyen and Dickie Allen’s raw vocals, then it cuts straight to the drummer and guitarist doing a very calm, and light jazz beat. It then goes right back into extremely fast blast beats for about 5 seconds, then goes right back to the jazz. Nice touch boys.

In conclusion, this album isn’t for the lighthearted. But for people like me, seeing how heavy a band really can go, I would 100% recommend. By far one of the best slam albums that’s been put out in a long time. If I had to rate it, it would be a 10/10.

 

Print Friendly, PDF & Email